Conference 2013

JULY 18th–20th IN AUSTIN, TX

class LoneStarRuby < Conference

    include Design, Community, Change  

end

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Keynote Speakers

  • Sandi Metz
    Sandi Metz

    Opening Keynote

    July 19, 2013

  • Steve Klabnik
    Steve Klabnik

    Closing Keynote

    July 19, 2013

  • Katrina Owen
    Katrina Owen

    Opening Keynote

    July 20, 2013

  • Avdi Grimm
    Avdi Grimm

    Closing Keynote

    July 20, 2013

Speakers

  • Adam Keys
    Adam Keys

    The Mechanics of Ruby

  • Akira Matsuda
    Akira Matsuda

    Diary of a Mad Rails Engineer

  • Alan Skorkin
    Alan Skorkin

    Why You Should Love The Command-Line And Get Rid of Your Rake Tasks Once and For All

  • Ashe Dryden
    Ashe Dryden

    Programming Diversity

  • Ben Hamill
    Ben Hamill

    I Made a Slow Thing Fast

  • Brandon Hays
    Brandon Hays

    Ember on Rails: #REALTALK

  • Bryan Helmkamp
    Bryan Helmkamp

    Building a Culture of Quality

  • Charles Lowell
    Charles Lowell

    Placing Things Into Other Things

  • Corey Ehmke
    Corey Ehmke

    Refactoring Legacy Apps with APIs and Messages

  • Dave Kapp
    Dave Kapp

    Advanced Asynchronicity

  • Dave Thomas
    Dave Thomas

    Elixir: Power of Erlang, Joy of Ruby

  • Ethan Garofolo
    Ethan Garofolo

    Neural Networks with RubyFANN

  • Evan Light
    Evan Light

    If It Bleeds, It Leads

  • J Austin Hughey
    J Austin Hughey

    App Server Arena: A Comparison of Ruby Application Servers

  • James Edward Gray II
    James Edward Gray II

    Ruby 2 Jeopardy

  • Joshua Schairbaum
    Joshua Schairbaum

    Fire It Up: Automated Provisioning

  • Kyle Rames
    Kyle Rames

    Cutting Through the Fog of Cloud

  • Matt Rogers
    Matt Rogers

    Open Source Protips from the Trenches

  • Mattt Thompson
    Mattt Thompson

    Building iOS Apps with Helios & RubyMotion

  • Nell Shamrell
    Nell Shamrell

    Beneath the Surface: Regular Expressions in Ruby

  • Dr. Nic Williams
    Dr. Nic Williams

    Automate everything with Jenkins and Ruby

  • Reid Gillette
    Reid Gillette

    Getting Called Up to the Majors

  • Richard Schneeman
    Richard Schneeman

    Forget Scaling: Focus on Performance

  • Sam Livingston-Gray
    Sam Livingston-Gray

    Fluent Refactoring

  • Sarah Mei
    Sarah Mei

    The End of Fun

  • Scott Bellware
    Scott Bellware

    TDD in Tatters

Trainers

  • Matt Konda
    Matt Konda

    Jemurai

  • Matt Kelly
    Matt Kelly

    Zurb

  • Anthony Lewis
    Anthony Lewis

    Mass Relevance

  • Johnny Winn
    Johnny Winn

    Hashrocket

  • Paul Elliott
    Paul Elliott

    Hashrocket

  • Jesse Wolgamott
    Jesse Wolgamott

    Comal Productions

  • Jonathan Birkholz
    Jonathan Birkholz

    Birkholz Creative

  • Sean Carolan
    Sean Carolan

    OpsCode

Panelists

Cloud Panel

Friday, July 19th at 1:00PM (CDT)
  • Greg Nokes
    Greg Nokes

    Technical Account Manager at Heroku

  • J Austin Hughey
    J Austin Hughey

    Field Application Engineer at Engine Yard

  • Dr. Nic Williams
    Dr. Nic Williams

    CEO at Stark & Wayne

  • Prashanth Rao
    Prashanth Rao

    Solutions Architect at HP Cloud

  • Jim Meyer
    Jim Meyer

    VP of Software Development at Rackspace

Ruby Rogues Panel

Saturday, July 20th at 1:00PM (CDT)
  • James Edward Gray II
    James Edward Gray II
  • Avdi Grimm
    Avdi Grimm
  • Charles Wood
    Charles Wood
  • Katrina Owen
    Katrina Owen
  • Josh Susser
    Josh Susser
  • David Brady
    David Brady

Sponsors

Social

Ruby

Lanyard

Conference Schedule

Wednesday, July 17thSpecial Events

6:00 PM — 7:00 PM
RailsBridge Preparation Clinic
(Get help installing Rails before class)
7:00 PM — 9:00 PM
Sponsored by Twilio Trainer & Volunteer Social

Thursday, July 18thTraining Day

8:00 AM — 9:00 AM
Breakfast & Registration
9:00 AM — 12:00 PM
Morning Training
12:00 PM — 1:30 PM
Lunch
1:30 PM — 4:30 PM
Afternoon Training
5:00 PM — 7:00 PM
Vendor Setup
7:00 PM — 9:00 PM
Sponsored by Twilio Speaker & Volunteer Social
9:00 PM — 11:00 PM
Sponsored by Twilio Movie Night at Alamo
*Shuttle provided between Alamo and Norris
11:00 PM — 12:00 AM
Sponsored by Twilio Pre-party at Cover 3
*Shuttle provided between Cover 3 and Norris

Friday, July 19thSpeakers, Day One

8:00 AM — 9:15 AM
Breakfast & Registration
9:15 AM — 9:30 AM
Opening Comments
9:30 AM — 10:20 AM
Sandi Metz, Opening Keynote
Sandi Metz

Sandi Metz

Friday, Opening Keynote
10:30 AM — 11:10 AM
James Edward Gray II
James Edward Gray II

James Edward Gray II

Ruby 2 Jeopardy

I will host a game of Jeopardy with questions and answers based on Ruby's syntax, features, standard libraries, etc. Anything that ships with Ruby 2.0 is fair game, new or old.

Three contestants of high Ruby skill will compete to score points with their arcane knowledge of our favorite language. There will be a prize for the winner of the game.

Richard Schneeman
Richard Schneeman

Richard Schneeman

Dissecting Ruby with Ruby

Underneath the beautiful veneer of our Ruby libraries lies a twisted tangle of writhing guts. Maybe you're curious how the pieces fit together or maybe you're tracking down a bug, either way it's easy to get lost in the blood and bile that ties our code together. In this talk you'll learn how to use simple and sharp Ruby tools to slice into large libraries with surgical precision. Turn your impossible bugs into pull requests, and level up your programming skills by Dissecting Ruby with Ruby.

11:20 AM — 12:00 PM
Dr. Nic Williams
Dr. Nic Williams

Dr. Nic Williams

Automate everything with Jenkins and Ruby

Jenkins is the central robot of your company. It continuous builds and runs everything you want to automate. Whilst its written in Java; it is very is easy to run AND entirely scriptable with Ruby.

In this talk we look at how to create Jenkins plugins with Ruby; how to create every-day jobs with Ruby; and the grand finale - how to TDD your plugin and jobs with more Ruby.

Joshua Schairbaum
Joshua Schairbaum

Joshua Schairbaum

Fire It Up: Automated Provisioning

At Rackspace, every minute spent on a manual task is a minute less spent providing fanatical support to customers. It's vital that we automate manual work. This talk is a case study of a group of Rackers who automated network device provisioning by leveraging new and existing services. Automating provisioning processes that stretch across the physical world and multiple applications is challenging. Shipping features on a time table and keeping a maintainable codebase require making intelligent tradeoffs. We want to share with you some of our insights into making these necessary tradeoffs.

12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Lunch
1:00 PM — 1:50 PM
Cloud Panel
1:50 PM — 2:40 PM
Special Guest Byron Reese

Byron Reese

Big Data and the Coming Golden Age of Humanity

This talk explores how the widespread proliferation of cheap sensors of all kinds will create a vast collective memory for the planet which will serve as a record of every cause and effect. This data will be scoured for associations that will be turned into algorithms which optimize every decision we have to make in life. And while we may not always choose to do those things, it will effectively make every person on the planet vastly wiser than the wisest person who has ever lived. In the future, no one will ever need to make a mistake again.

2:50 PM — 3:30 PM
Dave Thomas
Dave Thomas

Dave Thomas

Elixir: Power of Erlang, Joy of Ruby

I’m a language nut. I love trying them out, and I love thinking about their design and implementation. (I know, it’s sad.)

I came across Ruby in 1998 because I was an avid reader of comp.lang.misc (ask your parents). I downloaded it, compiled it, and fell in love. As with any time you fall in love, it’s difficult to explain why. It just worked the way I work, and it had enough depth to keep me interested.

Fast forward 15 years. All that time I’d been looking for something new that gave me the same feeling.

Then I came across Elixir, a language by José Valim, that puts a humane, Ruby-like syntax on the Erlang VM.

Now I’m dangerous. I want other people to see just how great this is. I want to evangelize. I won't try to convert you away from Ruby. But I might just persuade you to add Elixir to your toolset.

So come along and let me show you the things that I think make Elixir a serious alternative for writing highly reliable, scalable, and performant server code.

And, more important, let me show you some fun stuff.

Kyle Rames
Kyle Rames

Kyle Rames

Cutting Through the Fog of Cloud

In this talk, I am going to briefly talk about “what cloud is” and highlight the various types of cloud (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS). The bulk of the talk will be about using the fog gem using IaaS. I will discuss fog concepts (collections, models, requests, services, providers) and supporting these with actual examples using fog.

3:40 PM — 4:20 PM
Adam Keys
Adam Keys

Adam Keys

The Mechanics of Ruby

Ruby is a delightful language to work with. And yet, for years, we've been hearing about how MRI is too slow and inefficient for "serious" use. What does that mean? What would a "serious" Ruby runtime look like?

To understand these questions, we need to dig into the design of MRI. How does it work, and what are the underlying principles? What does common Ruby code look like as its executed by MRI? Once we've discovered what makes MRI tick, we can compare it to modern runtimes like Hotspot and V8 to understand why MRI is slower. From there we can take a look at JRuby and Rubinius and see how they seek to close the gap between Ruby runtimes and the competition.

In this talk, we'll dive into the internals of MRI, seeking to understand how it executes Ruby code. We'll look at ways to make our code faster, reduce garbage collection overhead, and find more concurrency in our programs. At the end, you will have a better understanding of how MRI works and how to write better code for it.

Corey Ehmke
Corey Ehmke

Corey Ehmke

Refactoring Legacy Apps with APIs and Messages

Rails as a framework is famous for getting an application up and running quickly, but the very paradigms that make it so easy at the start can lead to maintenance nightmares down the road. Successful applications grow rapidly larger, more complex, and harder to extend and maintain. One way to approach refactoring a monolithic application is dividing it up into a series of smaller applications that organize the work of the system through internal APIs and message queues. In this presentation you will be introduced to tools to enable this architecture, gain insight on how best to use them, and explore the guiding principles behind the SOA approach to refactoring.

4:30 PM — 5:10 PM
Bryan Helmkamp
Bryan Helmkamp

Bryan Helmkamp

Building a Culture of Quality

Time and time again, skilled developers with good intentions set out into the green field of their new Rails app. Alas, as days turn to weeks, weeks to months and months to years, they find themselves with an ever increasing maintenance burden. Adding new features in a well-designed way starts to feel like an exercise in futility, so they resort to liberal use of conditionals to avoid breaking existing code.

This leads to more complexity, and on the cycle goes.

It doesn't need to be like this. There's no silver bullet that will save your project from this fate, but by practicing a holistic approach to code quality you can stave off the maintenance monsters and keep your app's code feeling fresh and clean. This talk will look at low ceremony, common sense approaches to taking control of the quality of your codebase. You'll leave with an expanded toolbox of techniques to build a culture of quality within your organization.

J Austin Hughey
J Austin Hughey

J Austin Hughey

App Server Arena: A Comparison of Ruby Application Servers

There's no shortage of choice when it comes to application servers for Ruby/Rack apps. This talk will explain some of the differences between several options, explore configuration required to get them running, and attempt to benchmark performance of a simple application running behind each.

5:20 PM — 6:00 PM
Brandon Hays
Brandon Hays

Brandon Hays

Ember on Rails: #REALTALK

If you work in Rails and have ever wondered about Ember.js, you should know that Ember and Rails go together like Nutella and pretzels. (Which is to say, quite well indeed.)

Get an inside look of the experience of going from having never tried Ember to shipping a production application in it. What makes Ember a good match for certain types of applications? What's so different about it compared to other frameworks? What are the drawbacks?

Using anecdotes, code, and crudely-drawn stick figures, we'll dive into using Ember and Rails, including war stories of climbing over some of the (often surprising) roadblocks encountered along the way.

With this quick tour, you'll be equipped to jump in and start seeing the kind of crazy-ambitious applications you can build when you've got Ember.js in your toolset.

Charles Lowell
Charles Lowell

Charles Lowell

Placing Things into Other Things

The world of Ruby is a big and beautiful one. Like Cane from Kung-Fu, you could spend a lifetime wandering it's surface and never lack for an abundance of wonder. But there is an even larger world outside its walls that is also filled with amazing things. Based on lessons learned writing C extensions, Java extensions as well embedding interpreters (v8) and applications (Jenkins) inside Ruby, This talk will take you through the best ways to dress up any citizen of the galaxy in order to make it indistiguishable from one of our beloved planet Ruby.

6:10 PM — 7:00 PM
Steve Klabnik, Closing Keynote
Steve Klabnik

Steve Klabnik

Friday, Closing Keynote
7:00 PM — 7:15 PM
Closing Comments
7:30 PM — 10:00 PM
Sponsored by Rackspace Social at Hotel Allandale
10:00 PM — 12:00 AM
Sponsored by Rackspace Social, Part Deux at Cover 3
*Shuttle provided between Cover 3 and Norris

Saturday, July 20thSpeakers, Day Two

8:00 AM — 9:15 AM
Breakfast & Registration
9:15 AM — 9:30 AM
Opening Comments
9:30 AM — 10:20 AM
Katrina Owen, Opening Keynote
Katrina Owen

Katrina Owen

Saturday, Opening Keynote
10:30 AM — 11:10 AM
Akira Matsuda
Akira Matsuda

Akira Matsuda

Diary of a Mad Rails Engineer

Rails Engines are useful. We can make our code well structured and reusable using Engines.

Rails Engines are fun. You can publish your Engine repo to the world, then make yourself and the world better and happier.

Rails Engine is a sophisticated system. Even though 猿人 (en-jin) in Japanese means "ape-man".

Rails Engine is zen. Everything in our Rails app is an Engine, and Engine is everything. Even the Rails app itself should also be an Engine.

During my talk, you will get to know what exactly Rails::Engine is, and you will see some of my crazy Engine tips, ideas, and implementations around Rails::Engine.

Reid Gillette
Reid Gillette

Reid Gillette

Getting called up to the Majors

Shifting from an amateur web developer hacking away at my own projects in my living room to a professional Software Engineer at a startup in San Francisco was a huge change in the way I developed. After joining Mavenlink a year ago I went from tiny apps that were 100% my code, with fast test suites, hosted on Heroku to a giant Rails app with a complicated data model, a CI test suite that took an hour, and a legacy codebase touched by 30+ people. I've worked hard the last year to step up to the challenge and I've learned so much in the process. As the developer pool gets more and more junior there will be more people making the same journey as I did.

In this talk I will cover:

  • skills that are important (some I had, others I had to develop)
  • iteration planning
  • testing
  • debugging/support
  • polyglot skills
  • contributing to a team much more skilled than you
  • pair-programming with someone much more senior or junior than you
  • how culture at Mavenlink has helped me succeed
  • what you can do to help onboard and train up your Junior Developers
  • things you should look for in a Junior Developer candidate
11:20 AM — 12:00 PM
Sarah Mei
Sarah Mei

Sarah Mei

The End of Fun

I hate to break it to you, guys, but Ruby is old enough to drink. What started out as a small community full of fun, silliness, and connection has been growing. Our small codebases are now large. Our small companies are now large. And the large companies have finally figured out that they want in, too.

So maybe it’s time to start tackling Real Problems and Real Solutions in the world of Real Innovation. Maybe it’s time for the community to grow up, stop playing around, and get Serious™.

But…that’s not who we are. Our community thrives on creativity, play, and luck. And those things aren’t just a weird perk like not having to wear shoes in the office – creativity, play, and luck, when present, actually produce better software. As we grow our projects and our teams and invade the corporate cube farm, there are some things we can lay aside, and there are others we must hold on to as if our very identity depended on them.

Because it does.

Scott Bellware
Scott Bellware

Scott Bellware

TDD in Tatters

TDD has been tattered, torn, twisted, stood on its head, and pounded into an pulp of techno-fetishism. TDD was a game-changer, but the focus in the interceding years has shifted from technique to tools, and TDD has been devolving into a lost art. By tearing TDD down to its bones, this presentation presents TDD in its essence, free of tools, and reinforcing the primary focus on design principles. It attempts to convince you to return to a simpler time when TDD was still about design, and software developers were dutifully steeped in the critical importance of design principles. To avoid being held to any particularly offensive positions, this talk liberally attacking the status quo of testing and contemporary tool-focused TDD in Ruby, while introducing yet-another testing library in Ruby. :)

12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Lunch with Lightning Talks
1:00 PM — 1:50 PM
Ruby Rogues Panel
2:00 PM — 2:40 PM
Alan Skorkin
Alan Skorkin

Alan Skorkin

Why You Should Love The Command-Line And Get Rid of Your Rake Tasks Once and For All

Rake is ubiquitous in our community, it's in just about every project. But why is this so, it is awkward and inflexible (try passing some arguments to rake tasks), and the way we've come to use it almost encourages bad design. Interestingly we've had a better way, to handle the things that we use Rake for, since before Rake even existed - command-line apps. Apps that do one task and do it well, it's the unix philosophy.

The problem is that as far as most of us know, writing a good command-line app in Ruby is not easy. Fiddling with OptionParser to produce a hacky script is no better than Rake, if anything it is worse. But what if we had the technology to build excellent command-line apps simply and easily? Well, to some extent we already do, but most of the tools available don't go far enough and so never become a viable Rake alternative.

In this talk we'll try to figure out what features a command-line framework needs to become your go-to tool instead of Rake (and how close existing tools are to this ideal). We'll cover things like:

  • What exactly is so bad about Rake
  • What makes a good command-line interface
  • Configuring your command-line apps
  • What are your options for parsing options
  • Can a command-line framework encourage good code design?
  • Writing highly testable CLI apps
  • Etc.

And as an added bonus, while we talk about all this, we'll touch on good and bad code design as well as look at some of the unexpected corners of your app where 'bad' code is hiding.

Evan Light
Evan Light

Evan Light

If It Bleeds, It Leads

Many of us came to Ruby by way of Rails (including yours truly about six years ago). We came because our current solutions were clumsy and inconvenient. We came because we appreciated the relative simplicity that Rails offered. And we came because we believe that change is often a good thing.

But not all changes are beneficial.

Over several blog posts, books, and a couple of years, the Rails community has begun to choose complexity over simplicity. Let's talk about why. And let's talk about how we can try to recapture that simplicity that we so once adored.

2:50 PM — 3:30 PM
Mattt Thompson
Mattt Thompson

Mattt Thompson

Building iOS Apps with Helios & RubyMotion

Helios is an open-source framework that provides essential backend services for mobile apps, from data synchronization and user accounts to push notifications, in-app purchases, and passbook integration. This talk will show you how to get a networked iOS app up-and-running in just a few minutes, using Helios and RubyMotion.

Ethan Garofolo
Ethan Garofolo

Ethan Garofolo

Neural Networks with RubyFANN

Neural networks (NNs) not only sound really cool, but they can also solve some pretty interesting problems ranging from driving cars to spam detection to facial recognition.

Solving problems with NNs is challenging, because actually implementing a NN from scratch is difficult, and knowing how to apply it is more difficult. Fortunately, libraries, such as RubyFANN, exist to handle the first problem. Solving the second problem comes from experience.

This talk will show a few different approaches to applying NNs to such problems as spam detection and games, as well as discussing other areas where NNs might be a useful solution.

3:40 PM — 4:20 PM
Nell Shamrell
Nell Shamrell

Nell Shamrell

Beneath the Surface: Regular Expressions in Ruby

Many of us approach regular expressions with a certain fear and trepidation, using them only when absolutely necessary. We can get by when we need to use them, but we hesitate to dive any deeper into their cryptic world. Ruby has so much more to offer us. This talk showcases the incredible power of Ruby and the Oniguruma regex library Ruby runs on. It takes you on a journey beneath the surface, exploring the beauty, elegance, and power of regular expressions. You will discover the flexible, dynamic, and eloquent ways to harness this beauty and power in your own code.

Matt Rogers
Matt Rogers

Matt Rogers

Open Source Protips from the Trenches

Open Source projects can be hard to navigate for both new and old contributors alike. In this talk, we'll walk through some tips and tricks for dealing with the various pieces of open source projects. From dealing with trolls to nurturing one shot patch submitters into long time contributors we'll walk through various tips to get the most out of your open source experience

4:30 PM — 5:10 PM
Ben Hamill
Ben Hamill

Ben Hamill

I Made a Slow Thing Fast

The talk is a narrative retelling of how I took an application that needed to communicate with a slow external API and improved the user's experience in terms of speed. I'll talk about the situation that we started with, and then retell the story of measurement, and improvement and measurement and improvement.

I'll talk about perftools.rb, improving the *perception* of speed without having to actually make your code faster, MRI's Threads (when they're a good fit, and how and why we used them), a few strategies for managing threads, and a few other related topics. None of these topics will be discussed in great depth; the format is intended to be a retelling of the project, so I'll limit my discussion to the scope of how it applied to this specific project.

The talk will probably be of most interest to people who have little real-world experience with MRI's Threads and/or making users feel like an application is responding quickly. My hope is that showing these things in the context of a real project can help solidify understanding of topics that are often covered in contrived or theoretical examples (I know it did for me: I was totally new to a lot of this stuff when I started the project).

Sam Livingston-Gray
Sam Livingston-Gray

Sam Livingston-Gray

Fluent Refactoring

Fluency is "what you can say without having to think about how to say it." "Refactoring" is a language that describes ways to make your code better. I want to inspire you to learn more of that language, so you can make your code better without having to think about it.

I'll walk you through the process of reworking a 50-line controller action that's hard to comprehend, let alone refactor. We'll tease apart fiendishly intertwined structures, embrace duplication, use dirty tricks to our advantage, and uncover responsibilities—and bugs!—that weren't obvious at first glance.

5:20 PM — 6:00 PM
Ashe Dryden
Ashe Dryden

Ashe Dryden

Programming Diversity

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?

In this talk we’ll examine the causes behind the lack of diversity in our communities, events, and workplaces. We’ll discuss what we can do as community members, event organizers, and co-workers to not only combat this problem, but to encourage positive change by contributing to an atmosphere of inclusivity.

Objectives:

  • Educate about the lack of diversity and why it is a problem
  • Examine what is contributing to both the pipeline issue as well as attrition
  • Isolate what is and isn't working
  • Inspire direct action by examining our own behavior and learning more about the people around us so we can empathize better
Dave Kapp
Dave Kapp

Dave Kapp

Asynchronous Workers to the Resque

While Ruby is a terrific language, it doesn't offer a lot of ways to deal with asynchronous tasks using the default libraries. Thankfully, the community has come up with several great options for bringing asynchronicity to your applications. Resque is one of the forerunners of this, and it offers a lot of functionality and flexibility with an easily approachable API. Here, we'll go over several techniques for utilizing asynchronous workers to benefit your projects.

We'll start off with a review of how asynchronous processing works, and then we'll delve into three different things you can use Resque for: speeding up your applications by processing slow operations on the side, performing sequential updates with pipelining, and performing periodic maintenance tasks. We'll go over example code for how to handle these different situations and ideas for how to integrate them with existing applications.

While the examples will be given using Resque, the ideas and patterns discussed will be applicable to other worker queues, such as delayed_job and Sidekiq.

6:10 PM — 7:00 PM
Avdi Grimm, Closing Keynote
Avdi Grimm

Avdi Grimm

Closing Keynote
7:00 PM — 7:15 PM
Closing Comments

About RailsBridge

RailsBridge is free and open to the public, but requires registration via ThunderTix.
The RailsBridge event is on July 18th only. Lunch is included.
Tickets to this event do not include entry into the other Training or Conference events.
Register for RailsBridge

Rackspace Social

Rackspace is throwing an awesome party during LoneStarRuby Conference 2013! There will be loads of games to play- make sure to bring your favorite board game!- and feel free to bring a swimsuit, as the space has a pool to cool off in. You're not going to want to miss this!

Training Information

Half-Day Training Options (July 18th)

Not willing to commit to a full-day of learning on one topic? We're mixing things up a bit this year and offering courses in 3-hour nuggets. Pick a morning track and then pack up and move to another track for the afternoon or just stay put.

Lunch is open on Training Day, so that means we want you to get out for some fresh air and reboot. Visit the nearby restaurants, all within walking distance. Coupons will be available for the frugal among us.

Lunch Options

These are within the same general area as the conference center, are walkable without having to cross any major roadways.

  • Dos Batos Woodfired Tacos
  • Elevation Burger
  • Hanabi Japanese Cuisine
  • McAlisters Deli
  • Noodles & Company
  • Panda Express
  • PhoNatic Vietnamese Cuisine
  • Saladworks
  • Schlotzskys
  • Sonic
  • Tärka Indian Kitchen
  • The Egg & I Breakfast and Lunch
  • Walmart
  • Which Wich? Superior Sandwiches
  • Yogurtland

Evening Entertainment Options

These are walkable from conference center, but across a busy street (Anderson Lane)

  • Alamo Drafthouse Dinner & Movies
  • Cover 3

Morning Training Sessions (9am–12pm)

Sarah Mei

RailsBridge Morning Workshop

by Sarah Mei of Pivotal Labs & RailsBridge

Beginner Level

RailsBridge is free and open to the public, but requires registration via ThunderTix. The RailsBridge event is on July 18th only. Lunch is not included. Tickets to this event does not include entry into the other Training or Conference events.

You can register for RailsBridge via ThunderTix.

Katrina Owen
Steve Klabnik

Detangling Rails: Eating an Elephant

by Steve Klabnik and Katrina Owen of Jumpstart Lab

Intermediate Level

In this hands-on workshop you will be presented with an actual Rails application ripe with code smells, tight coupling, leaky encapsulation, and missing abstractions. It's much more than a code sample, written by a real team of developers under a deadline. We will practice identifying issues, explore strategies to attack them, and put them into practice. This is not a walk-through of every refactoring in the cannon; this is practical application of great techniques. After this workshop you will be armed to attack your own legacy applications.

In this morning workshop, we will explore techniques and tools to help you decide where to start, and move those first shovel-fulls without triggering an avalanche.

Anthony Lewis

From X to Ruby

by Anthony Lewis of Mass Relevance

Intermediate Level

Are you a developer looking to get into Ruby? This hands-on session will cover Ruby syntax and idioms with a focus on things you don't find in other languages. Learn how to how to use language features such as symbols and blocks, take advantage of Ruby's Enumerable module, and build your own classes.

Matt Kelly

Building with Foundation

by Matt Kelly of Zurb

Intermediate Level

An introductory implementation-focused class on learning the fundamentals of using Zurb Foundation, the world's most advanced responsive framework that's Mobile First.

Matt Konda

Attacking Rails

by Matt Konda of Jemurai

Intermediate Level

In this session, we will use a variety of tools and approaches to attack a real world Ruby on Rails application. Through the course of attacking it, we will be exposed to tools and concepts that will inform our development. To the extent possible, participants will be able to follow along and execute command injection to pop a shell on an application box, sql injection to access restricted data, and xss to map an internal network and turn on a users’ webcam.

Tools: BeEF, nmap, arachni, curl

Concepts: Several key classes of vulnerabilities.

Matt Ray

Getting Started with Chef

by Matt Ray of OpsCode

Intermediate Level

This session is a an introduction to the basic architecture of the Chef framework, tools and API. After familiarizing ourselves with the concepts and terminology, we will review cookbooks, recipes and resources and walk through examples that show how it works.

Johnny Winn
Paul Elliott

The Hashrocket Way: A View to a Pair

by Johnny Winn and Paul Elliott of Hashrocket

Intermediate Level

Getting excited about pairing is easy but taking the next step can be a challenge. How do you get started and what does a pairing workflow look like? At Hashrocket we pair on every project as well as our open source contributions. This gives us a unique perspective on pairing. In this session we will discuss the tools and processes Hashrocket uses to pair. We will also guide you through our workflow as we deliver features for our current Hashrocket University project. The session will answer your questions on pairing and give you insight into how Hashrocket has addressed pairing challenges.

Afternoon Training Sessions (1:30pm–4:30pm)

Sarah Mei

RailsBridge Afternoon Workshop

by Sarah Mei of Pivotal Labs

Beginner Level

RailsBridge is free and open to the public, but requires registration via ThunderTix. The RailsBridge event is on July 18th only. Lunch is not included. Tickets to this event does not include entry into the other Training or Conference events.

You can register for RailsBridge via ThunderTix.

Katrina Owen
Steve Klabnik

Detangling Rails: Meticulous Arrangement

by Steve Klabnik and Katrina Owen of Jumpstart Lab

Intermediate Level

In this hands-on workshop you will be presented with an actual Rails application ripe with code smells, tight coupling, leaky encapsulation, and missing abstractions. It's much more than a code sample, written by a real team of developers under a deadline. We will practice identifying issues, explore strategies to attack them, and put them into practice. This is not a walk-through of every refactoring in the cannon; this is practical application of great techniques. After this workshop you will be armed to attack your own legacy applications.

In this afternoon workshop, we will attack a small area of sludge and methodically uncover, clean, and polish a piece of code and put each piece in its place in the models, views, controllers, and helpers.

Anthony Lewis

Advanced Ruby

by Anthony Lewis of Mass Relevance

Advanced Level

Go beyond the basics with Ruby's dynamic features. Learn about Ruby's object model and how methods are found. Create and use your own modules / mixins. Finish with walk through metaprogramming - understand class_eval and instance_eval, define methods at run time, and use method_missing to handle calls to methods that aren't defined.

Jesse Wolgamott
Jonathan Birkholz

Angular.js with Rails

by Jesse Wolgamott and Jonathan Birkholz

Intermediate Level

Learn how to create an Angular rich client application. We'll showcase best practices, and use working code to build a rich experience app: WalkAbout. Clients will create a mobile web app that plots photos along a path in a city — learn to integrate Authentication, Forms, GoogleMaps, and photos with a Rails API.

Matt Konda

Defending Rails

by Matt Konda of Jemurai

Intermediate Level

In this session, we’ll use a code analysis tool to identify and fix some of the holes that were present in the attack session. We’ll start with a working attack and finish with code that is resistant to that attack. This session will also introduce some things organizations can do at a process level (SDLC) to build more secure code from the start.

Tools: Brakeman, Rails, text editor, Postgres

Concepts: OWASP Top 10

Matt Ray

Hands-on with Chef

by Matt Ray of OpsCode

Intermediate Level

This session continues the "Getting Started with Chef" session with a hands on lab. The class includes hands-on exercises to reinforce the material. At the end of the class, students will have a code repository that can be used and modified to solve real business problems with Chef. Students will be expected to provide an SSH-capable laptop to participate in the exercises.

Johnny Winn
Paul Elliott

The Hashrocket Way: A View to a Pair

by Johnny Winn and Paul Elliott of Hashrocket

Intermediate Level

Getting excited about pairing is easy but taking the next step can be a challenge. How do you get started and what does a pairing workflow look like? At Hashrocket we pair on every project as well as our open source contributions. This gives us a unique perspective on pairing. In this session we will discuss the tools and processes Hashrocket uses to pair. We will also guide you through our workflow as we deliver features for our current Hashrocket University project. The session will answer your questions on pairing and give you insight into how Hashrocket has addressed pairing challenges.

This afternoon session is a repeat of the morning session, but will include deeper dives into more tools and methodologies for folks who want to spend the whole day with us!

Ruby Rogues Live Podcast

The Ruby Rogues will be recording a live podcast from LSRC on July 20th.

Ruby Rogues

Official Conference Information